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mucholderthen:

Harvard discovers three of its library books are bound in human flesh

As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research. Waste not, want not, I suppose.

(Posted at Roadtrippers by Greg Newkirk / 31 March, 2014)

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fuckyeahforensics:

A new formula helps CSIs determine whether a victim took a blow standing up.
1// Height of the blood at the beginning of its parabolic arc, that is, when it left the body.
2// Tangent of the angle at which the first blood drop hit the ground.
3// Tangent of the angle at which the second drop hit the ground.
4// Horizontal distance the first drop traveled.
5// Horizontal distance the second drop traveled.

fuckyeahforensics:

A new formula helps CSIs determine whether a victim took a blow standing up.

1// Height of the blood at the beginning of its parabolic arc, that is, when it left the body.

2// Tangent of the angle at which the first blood drop hit the ground.

3// Tangent of the angle at which the second drop hit the ground.

4// Horizontal distance the first drop traveled.

5// Horizontal distance the second drop traveled.

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humanoidhistory:

The Space Shuttle Columbia blasts off from Cape Canaveral on March 1, 2002. (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

The Space Shuttle Columbia blasts off from Cape Canaveral on March 1, 2002. (NASA)

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depravity-x:

Aftermath of a suicide bombing.

depravity-x:

Aftermath of a suicide bombing.

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operationbarbarossa:

Pfc. D. C. Cox of the 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division searches the ruined buildings in Mürringen for German snipers; Belgium - 30 January 1945

operationbarbarossa:

Pfc. D. C. Cox of the 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division searches the ruined buildings in Mürringen for German snipers; Belgium - 30 January 1945

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tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.

To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»

(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)

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for-science-sake:

Time-lapse of Stinkhorn Fungus growth.

for-science-sake:

Time-lapse of Stinkhorn Fungus growth.

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humanoidhistory:

The Moon, 1972. Astronaut Dave Scott, commander for the Apollo 15 mission, moonwalks through the Hadley Delta. (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

The Moon, 1972. Astronaut Dave Scott, commander for the Apollo 15 mission, moonwalks through the Hadley Delta. (NASA)

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foxandevans:

A marine from the Dutch fleet in Rotterdam. 14 December 1934.

foxandevans:

A marine from the Dutch fleet in Rotterdam. 14 December 1934.

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humanoidhistory:

"I know that science and technology are not just cornucopias pouring good deeds out into the world. Scientists not only conceived nuclear weapons; they also took political leaders by the lapels, arguing that their nation — whichever it happened to be — had to have one first."
—Carl Sagan, 1990

humanoidhistory:

"I know that science and technology are not just cornucopias pouring good deeds out into the world. Scientists not only conceived nuclear weapons; they also took political leaders by the lapels, arguing that their nation — whichever it happened to be — had to have one first."

Carl Sagan, 1990

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